BD sponsors clinical trials to identify best practice insulin delivery techniques

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With over 100 years’ experience in healthcare solutions and services, BD is the leading sponsor of multinational clinical trials, which identify best practice insulin delivery techniques6. Come and talk to us at the BD stand, A1, so we can start our partnership together.

Studies have shown that many people who inject or infuse insulin have lipohypertrophy5,6,7. Lipohypertrophy can be described as an accumulation of hypertrophied fat tissue underneath the surface of skin2. From a total of over 800 patients, at least 50% of those patients had lipohypertrophy lesions1,5,6,7. These lesions can lead to unexplained hypoglycaemia and glycaemic variation1,5,  which in turn can lead to ambulance call outs, A&E admission, unplanned hospitalisation and injury1,7. It can also lead to suboptimal HbA1c, which has longer term effects for patients1,7,8.

Insulin injected into a lipohypertrophy site impairs insulin absorption4. Before a drug can begin to exert any effect on the body, it has to be absorbed into the body’s blood stream. When comparing an injection into a lipohypertrophy site to healthy tissue, the total insulin exposure was 46% less and the maximum insulin concentration was 42% lower4.

Clinical intervention studies have shown what can be done when proper injection technique training is given1. Evidence shows that within a 3-6 month period, with proper injection technique training, there was a reduction of HbA1c of 0.5mmol/mol, a reduction in total insulin dose of around 5 units a day, a reduction in hypoglycaemic events by 40% and a reduction in glycaemic variation of 41%1.

BD now wants to partner with NHS organisations, including CCGs/Health Boards, Federations, Diabetes Centres and Practices, to improve diabetes clinical outcomes as shown in the clinical intervention studies1,5,6. Partner with BD and together we can show that getting the basics of insulin delivery right can have a clinically significant impact on your patient’s health and wellbeing, reduce burden of care and overall costs1.

Come and talk to us at the BD stand, A1, so we can start our partnership together.

For more information on the studies Blanco, Grassi, ESLA, FITTER, PK/PD they can be available on request from BD.

 

References

  1. Smith M., Clapham L. & Strauss K. UK lipohypertrophy interventional study. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. 126 (2017) 248-253
  2. Definitions from Medline Plus, an online service of the US National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  3. Young RJ, Hannan WJ, Frier BM, Steel JM, Duncan LJ. Diabetic lipohypertrophy delays insulin absorption. Diabetes Care 1984;7:479–480pmid:6389062
  4. Hövelmann U, et. al. Insulin Injection into Regions with Lipohypertrophy (lipo) Worsens Postprandial (PP) Blood Glucose (BG) Versus Injections into Normal Adipose Tissue (NAT). 2015; 64 (suppl1). Poster presented at ADA meeting, Boston, MA. June 2015
  5. Blanco M, Hernández MT, Strauss KW, Amaya M. Prevalence and risk factors of lipohypertrophy in insulin-injecting patients with diabetes. Diabetes Metab. 2013 Oct;39(5):445-53.
  6. G. Grassi, Scuntero P, Trepiccioni R, et al. Optimizing insulin injection technique and its effect on blood glucose control. Journal of Clinical & Translational Endocrinology 1 (2014): 145-150. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).
  7. Frid et al. New Insulin Delivery Recommendations. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. September 2016; 91 (9): 1231-1255.
  8. Ulrike Hovelmann, Susanne Famulla, Lidia Hermanski, Annelie Fischer, Lutz Heinemannn, Matthias Kaltheuner, Laurence Hirsch, Tim Heise,. Insulin Injection into Regions with Lipohypertrophy (LHT) Worsens Postprandial (PP) Blood Glucose (BG) Versus Injections into Normal Adipose Tissue (NAT). Abstract 2015 ADA.

 

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